Archives For culture

On Thursday night at Comic-Con, we happened to score tickets to a party hosted at Bang Bang with Elijah Wood as DJ! It was a surreal experience. We loved dancing the night away with fellow geeks and Wood’s actor friends– and the club had exquisite decor. We couldn’t help but take a bunch of pictures of the bathroom…

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This is a busy week! So, I’m just going to dump photos here from our daily Comic-Con adventures. Enjoy!

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legendarium podcast horror

A while ago, I had the privilege of discussing one of my favorite things as a guest on The Legendarium Podcast with my brilliant friend, Emma. For the record, I whole-heartedly recommend getting together to discuss stuff with strangers who share your interests. As guests on The Legendarium, Emma and I had the opportunity to discuss horror themes, cosplay, and genre tropes with some fine people with great insights, and I left with warm fuzzies. Check out the episode here!

spiderman thinks about cash

As I’m sure you’ve heard, Sony finally decided to split custody of Spider-Man, and it looks like he’ll be visiting mom on some very important weekends in the future. After a few personal conversations, I’ve come to the conclusion that most people are pretty excited. I feel that.

A few people are worried, though. Or maybe tired is a better word. News of another “Spider-Man reboot” induces cringing for these peeps, and this is my response to them. There are certain detractors that I’m not going to convince, and to those people I say that perhaps the next decade of big-budget movies should be something that they avoid, because franchising and multi-part plots aren’t going away. That’s great news, though!

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fairy-tale-book

A while ago, I mentioned that I had the incredible opportunity to contribute to the book Channeling Wonder: Fairy Tales on Television, and it’s easily my biggest accomplishment of 2014. I’m astounded to hold my hard work in my hands (I mean, look at that pretty cover!), but most of all, I’m honored and humbled to have my name alongside several rockstar academics, such as Pauline Greenhill, Jill Rudy, and Cristina Bacchilega.

If you’re interested in fairy tales, television, folklore, or cultural studies, you can now buy Channeling Wonder on Amazon or for a limited time, you’ll get 40% off when you order through Wayne State University Press with promo code HS14. Happy Reading!

big bang theory

Before I hurt everyone’s feelings, let me say that I see the charm of The Big Bang Theory. The show has all the right elements: geeky characters, empowered female scientists, and a running theme about the importance of friendship. I want to like this show so much, it pains me. I’ve kept up-to-date with it, and I’m left trying to figure out why. Maybe I’m waiting for it to get better, or maybe it satisfies the TV-equivalent craving of eating a McGriddle, or maybe I’m trying to connect with my fellow man. To be sure, the show is more interesting than other typical sitcoms, but it has so much lost potential. While the show seemingly celebrates all the things I love—comics, cosplay, smart characters, snarky best friends— it actually mercilessly ridicules them in a way that, for me, is the opposite of fun.

Instead of celebrating geekery, individuality, and being your own person, Big Bang Theory proves everyone’s 8th-grade assumptions about nerdiness. The smart characters may have found success, but they lack social currency. At the beginning of the show, most of the jokes centered on Leonard, Raj, and Howard awkwardly trying to score dates and Sheldon just being awkward. As the show progresses, the guys snag girlfriends (and Howard a wife), but the cruxes of most of the jokes are still the same: the guys aren’t “cool” and they are into “nerdy stuff.” Nerds are so weird and impossible to understand! *Cue laugh track.*

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the one i love film

When I’d seen posters for The One I Love, I wasn’t sold. It was only after I’d found myself near a movie theater, looking for something to do and a screening of the film starting in 10 minutes that I decided to jump on board—and I’m so glad I did.

From what I’d previously seen, I worried that the film would be sappy. I don’t gravitate toward romantic comedies, and even when I’m assured it’s not a “typical” one, I usually still want the two hours of my life back. So, in an effort to avoid revealing the twists and turns of this film—I highly recommend avoiding trailers and reviews—let me just get the cliché over with and say: this is not a typical romantic comedy. I don’t even know if I would classify it as such, but there you go.

Rest assured, while the slow reveals in The One I Love keep you attentive, the film does not solely rely on the element of surprise. It’s the film’s impressive acting, honest writing, and beautiful cinematography that make it stand out as one of the best films of the year, and the practical details ring true to anyone who has asked themselves: how do you figure yourself out enough to be happy?

Rather than simply being about romantic scuffles and humorous miscommunication, the film tackles more complex ideas about how to develop meaningful relationships with people—not in the abstract, not solely in the romantic arena, and not without messiness. It’s no easy feat, and yet the film pulls it off, where lesser writing and acting would come off as too preachy or neatly-packaged.

I have to stop myself before I say too much, but please do yourself a favor and go see this film.

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