Archives For art

With Halloween fast approaching, it’s time for False Positive‘s yearly treat for your eyeballs: 31 Days of Halloween! If you’re not familiar, False Positive is a horror webcomic anthology, showcasing short stories of the surreal, fantastic, and macabre. While reading, you might notice that the stories draw inspiration from cult classics, including Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Tales from the Darkside, and The Twilight Zone. In other words, False Positive stories will keep you on your toes– you’ll never be sure exactly how things will shake out. To get a taste for the site and the kind of horrific goodies it offers, I recommend starting at the beginning, with the first story updated on the site:  “Concoction.” It’s sure to satisfy your Halloween story cravings.

Every day during the month of October, False Positive uploads a new horror-themed, pop-culture art piece that’s sure to inspire awe, terror, and perhaps outright giddiness. This is the fifth year in a row that False Positive has engaged in its annual celebration of October in all its glory, so if you haven’t seen the pieces from years past, it’s worth digging into the 31 Days of Halloween inventories and taking a look. Seeing False Positive‘s horror-themed art every year is one of my favorite parts of the season, and it always signals the official start of my favorite month, getting me into the Halloween spirit.

To whet your whistle, here are some examples of art pieces from past 31 Days of Halloween:

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Mega Munny Art Piece

Ashley Walton —  February 11, 2013 — Leave a comment

This is a Munny, and it is the most unique wedding gift we received (and believe me, we got plenty of unique gifts). Currently, it sits proudly on one of our large bookshelves and tallies compliments from guests.

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For those of you unfamiliar with the magical world of Kid Robot, go to their site educate yourself. It’s a company based out of LA that primarily makes vinyl figures designed by contemporary artists, but they also have pillows, large installation figures, and street clothes. Over the years, we’ve collected our fair share of blind box figures, along with t-shirts and hoodies. And if you’re a Comic-Con frequenter, Kid Robot always has a cool booth with artists doodling on giant Munnys.

It just so happens that my brother is the ever-talented artist and writer behind False Positive, and he generously bought a blank Mega Munny and painted it for us. Let me be clear: this is by far the coolest thing in our apartment. We like to think there’s a story behind this Munny—that this girl (vampire?) is a monster slayer, who sews clothes out of the skins of her slaughtered prey.

Enjoy.

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This film was much more intelligent and complicated than I initially gave it credit for. As usual, I don’t want to give too much away, because this film unwraps itself deliberately and poignantly. I do want to make it clear that this film is not about Banksy. And it’s not even a film about graffiti/street art. Rather, this is a film about what art means and how people interact with it, and the vehicle through which it explores these questions is so interesting and so grounded in a terrifying reality that it took me by surprise. Halfway through the film I thought, “Why is it lingering on these odd moments?” but it made sense as the film progressed (as does the film’s title), and it ended up being one of the most thought-provoking films I’ve seen in a while. It was clever, funny, and earnest, leaving me satisfied and smiling. I recommend this film to anyone who is remotely interested in art and its relationship with the public.
The Art of the Steal was the most engaging documentary I’ve seen in a long time. It’s about the Barnes Foundation, which houses the most priceless art collection in the United States. When Dr. Albert Barnes died, he left specific instructions in his will for how the art should be displayed and protected, but many people and organizations had other ideas for his collection.
Like any good documentary, this film had me angry and up in arms by the end. As a warning: it’s definitely a slanted telling of the story, but it’s a slant I happen to agree with. With its simple premise, this film explores complex themes of the meaning of art, how art should be displayed, principles of private ownership, and moral obligations as a society. It’s definitely worth a rent. I dare you to not feel passionately about the Barnes Foundation by the end of it.