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More Christmas Geekery

Ashley Walton —  December 22, 2012 — 2 Comments

We’ve been busily enjoying time off from work and general holiday merriment, but we wanted to share a quick post with some more of our Christmas geekery. We hope everyone has a happy winter solstice with good memories and, of course, good food!

geek presents(wrapping paper from ThinkGeek: Christmas bots, zombies, and bacon patterns)

geek tree(tree)

skull ornament(skull ornament, Target)

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When guests to our apartment step into our bathroom without  warning about the décor, they’re usually a bit startled. (Who am I kidding? We never give warning. We love seeing our friends’ horror-stricken faces.) Our bathroom screams slasher horror or perhaps zombie apocalypse. Personally, I like to think it’s reminiscent of the shower scene in Psycho. Our shower curtain and bathmat are soaked in tasteful blood splatters, as well as bloody handprints and footprints, and we have a lovely saying about zombies hanging on the wall (from our wedding, of course).

Now if we can just get the rest of the apartment looking this cool, we’ll be in business. (Literally. We could probably charge for tours due to pure awesomeness.)

A Very Geeky Wedding

Ashley Walton —  August 16, 2012 — 1 Comment
I’ve been a slacker about the blog, mostly because right after Comic-Con I married my best friend and ran away on a honeymoon. But I wanted to share some of the details from our geeky wedding reception. It was everything I hoped it would be and more: casual, fun, and completely suited to our personalities.
(walkway)
Our announcement was written and illustrated by Mike Walton (creator of Dual and falsepositivecomic.com). For an even better viewing experience, you can see it on imgur: http://imgur.com/a/qoR4L .
This film was much more intelligent and complicated than I initially gave it credit for. As usual, I don’t want to give too much away, because this film unwraps itself deliberately and poignantly. I do want to make it clear that this film is not about Banksy. And it’s not even a film about graffiti/street art. Rather, this is a film about what art means and how people interact with it, and the vehicle through which it explores these questions is so interesting and so grounded in a terrifying reality that it took me by surprise. Halfway through the film I thought, “Why is it lingering on these odd moments?” but it made sense as the film progressed (as does the film’s title), and it ended up being one of the most thought-provoking films I’ve seen in a while. It was clever, funny, and earnest, leaving me satisfied and smiling. I recommend this film to anyone who is remotely interested in art and its relationship with the public.
The Art of the Steal was the most engaging documentary I’ve seen in a long time. It’s about the Barnes Foundation, which houses the most priceless art collection in the United States. When Dr. Albert Barnes died, he left specific instructions in his will for how the art should be displayed and protected, but many people and organizations had other ideas for his collection.
Like any good documentary, this film had me angry and up in arms by the end. As a warning: it’s definitely a slanted telling of the story, but it’s a slant I happen to agree with. With its simple premise, this film explores complex themes of the meaning of art, how art should be displayed, principles of private ownership, and moral obligations as a society. It’s definitely worth a rent. I dare you to not feel passionately about the Barnes Foundation by the end of it.